Analysis of Genuine Karate: Misconceptions, Origins, Development, and True Purpose

Analysis of Genuine Karate: Misconceptions, Origins, Development, and True Purpose

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Genuine karate is an Okinawan martial art for self-defense; its principle of "never changing kata" is critical to its effectiveness

"The changes made to karate in mainland Japan and in America have altered karate so intrinsically that it can no longer claim to be genuine karate." Dr. Hermann Bayer, Ph.D., examines how Japan re-interpreted Okinawan karate to create its own unique style of karate-do, and how Japanese and American changes resulted in a modern karate-sport business.

Practitioners of karate are often confused, misguided, and even led to believe that karate is just karate--this is far from the truth. Practitioners need a clear understanding of what their training can offer them. This can only be achieved by "seeing the trees through the forest" or by discerning misconception from fact.

Contents include

  • Okinawan karate's "principle of never changing kata".
  • Karate as an Okinawan cultural heritage.
  • Socio-cultural arguments to preserve Okinawa karate--as is.
  • Japan--the karate reproducing country.
  • Karate or Karate-do?
  • The business of karate, karate-do, and karate-sport.
  • Scientific proof of a peaceful karate mind.
  • The laws of physics reveal weaknesses when kata are changed.

This substantially researched work makes a compelling case for the socio-cultural and historic arguments to conserve genuine Okinawan karate. Supported by historical facts, scientific analysis, and public records, Dr. Bayer reveals, for all to see, the complex evolution of karate and the unsettled claims made upon it by the various stake-holders.



Author: Hermann Bayer
Publisher: YMAA Publication Center
Published: 10/01/2021
Pages: 208
Binding Type: Paperback
Weight: 0.65lbs
Size: 8.90h x 5.90w x 0.60d
ISBN: 9781594398438

Review Citation(s):
Kirkus Reviews 01/01/0001