Peter F. Drucker on Economic Threats

Peter F. Drucker on Economic Threats

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How to Adjust to Shifts in the Economy

In these forty salient essays, renowned management thinker Peter F. Drucker explores how social, political, and economic contexts impact the manager's role. Considered against the backdrop of the twenty-first-century marketplace, with its breathless pace, complex political issues, economic threats, and ruthless global competition, the book's wisdom and insights are classic Drucker: timeless, prescient, and practical.

Arguing that management is charged not only with responding to the complex economic issues of the day but also with meeting the needs of customers and employees, Drucker addresses a wide variety of topics that touch on both the professional and the personal aspects of managing in a changing world, among them:

  • Emerging developments in the global economy
  • Changes in the global workforce
  • The measurement of business performance
  • Shifting employee and consumer expectations

Both forward-thinking and practical, Peter F. Drucker on Economic Threats offers ideas and insights today's managers can use to achieve consistent, successful results, even as the world around them changes.

Author: Peter F. Drucker
Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press
Published: 05/05/2020
Pages: 288
Binding Type: Hardcover
Weight: 1.10lbs
Size: 9.40h x 6.40w x 1.20d
ISBN: 9781633699595

About the Author

Peter F. Drucker (1909-2005) is one of the best-known and most widely influential thinkers on the subject of management theory and practice, and his writings contributed to the philosophical and practical foundations of the modern corporation.

Often described as the father of modern management theory, Drucker explored how people are organized across the business, government, and nonprofit sectors of society; he predicted many of the major business developments of the late twentieth century, including privatization and decentralization, the rise of Japan to economic world power, the critical importance of marketing, and the emergence of the information society with its implicit necessity of lifelong learning. In 1959, Drucker coined the term knowledge worker and in his later life considered knowledge-worker productivity to be the next frontier of management.

Peter Drucker died on November 11, 2005, in Claremont, California. He had four children and six grandchildren.

You can find more about Peter F. Drucker at cgu.edu/center/the-drucker-institute.